The Palace

Grand Staircase

This staircase is famous in its own right: something fabulous that could be created only by demanding the best. Each of the steps is made of one piece of solid marble and visitors ascending them marvel at the impressive size of each slab of marble on the walls. This feature of the house stands as an artistic and technical achievement for the team of decorators and for the Marquis Scicluna .The staircase was designed by the sculptor Giuseppe Valenti, who is responsible for the most of the marble work in the Palazzo. This is among his last works before his death in 1903.

Grand Staircase at Palazzo Parisio

The remarkable pièce de resistance, however, is the coping stone over the bannisters. It is one long, solid piece of marble. Annibale Lupi wrote to many companies for a quote for the piece of marble but they refused to commit to such outlandish measurements. The Marquis Scicluna would not waver and reduce the measurements and a company finally agreed to the 6m block and the marble was cut accordingly. The marble starts at the half-landing and rises all the way to the first floor or piano nobile. It is in fact the third piece ordered during the construction of the Palazzo. The first stone, carved to order at the great marble quarries of Carrara, Italy, was lost at sea when the ship carrying it to Malta foundered. On the next attempt a second great stone reached Malta only to be damaged while being ferried to shore. The third piece, fortunately, represented a triumph for the many people involved in the great project. The huge section of marble, the largest on the island, was safely transported with the help of some 40 artillery mules from the harbour to Naxxar where it was finally and carefully laid in its present place for future generations to admire. 

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