The Palace

The Landing

Here the choice of paving was inspired by one of the floors in the Vatican. Facing you as you reach the top of the stairs are two imposing wooden doors, tall and highly polished. But close inspection reveals that the door on the right is in fact stone mimicry. It is a trompe-l’œil and is actually carved stone painted to look exactly like the working door alongside it. This imitation door was created so that visitors ascending the stairs would face perfect symmetry.  Documents show that the Marquis Scicluna intended the landing to be called the Armoury and have it decorared with suits of armour, some of which can still be seen, and other military paraphernalia.

The Landing at Palazzo Parisio

Above is Venuti’s History of Malta. In the painting, in addition to representations of the French and British periods, Emperor Charles V of Spain is seen presenting Malta to the Knights of the Order of St John in 1530. Another illustration commemorates the advent of steam on the island as a mode of transport and power. Among many innovations, the Palazzo was the first on the island to be equipped with a domestic steam driven generator, made by Crossley, in Manchester. Above the door to the right is St Paul landing at what seems already to be St Paul’s Bay as his statue, placed there in 1845, is clearly visible on what is now St Paul’s Island.

To the left, if walking onto the terrace outside, there is a fine view of the Italianate gardens below that add so much to the Marquis’s concept of this great palace. Improving the Orangerie in the garden was another of his inspired visions.

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